Assignment Criminal Justice profile Shae90 Main
August 15, 2020
needs task and learner analysis 1
August 15, 2020

Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies

Prerequisite: BDes and BFA students: 3.0 credits first year studio and 1.0 credits liberal studies, including the first year writing course. BA Honours program students may register with approval; contact Faculty of Liberal Arts office at liberalstudies@ocadu.ca or 416-977-6000 ext. 372 or 3351

Antirequisite: Students who have taken ACAD 2B16 may not take this course for further credit.

Course Calendar Description:

This lecture course draws from the broad spectrum of twentieth century thought to introduce students to issues and competing perspectives that have had an impact on the art, design and culture of our time. Ideas and issues to be examined include archetypes and the collective unconscious, behaviourism and the machine model of humanity, imperialism and the conflict of ideologies, existentialism and the plight of the individual, feminism and the Other, the postmodern condition and post-structuralism.

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS/COURSE PACKS:

Twentieth Century Ideas (coursepack). Available at 51 McCaul Street.

Secret of the Five Powers. Gretl Satorius. Mindcloud Entertainment, 2014.

FILMS TO BE VIEWED OUTSIDE OF CLASS:

Donna Read. The Burning Times. National Film Board of Canada, 1990. 56 mins.

David Grubin. The Life of Buddha. Public Broadcasting System. 2013. 112 mins.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon completion of this course, students will have been introduced to a thematic reading of the major ideas and events of the twentieth century; discern how those ideas emerged from the lives and contexts of their authors; and exercise lateral thinking in identifying connections between those ideas and their own artistic endeavours at OCADU.

COURSE ORGANIZATION:

This course is organized around a three-hour lecture, with discussions and film screenings. Students are expected to read the required readings, attend all classes, participate in all activities and contribute to discussion. Plan to accommodate a minimum of five hours per week of homework for this course. Absences from class must be supported with official documentation; three unsupported absences may jeopardize your standing in the course.

Research Paper (30%)

Students are asked to write a research paper, twenty-five hundred words in length, on any topic related to the content of readings and lectures, or, with the permission of the course instructor, a topic that falls within the purview of twentieth century intellectual history. Your paper should make use of minimum three primary sources, whether these be peer-reviewed academic journal articles or books from university presses, or writings or lectures by any of the thinkers and artists considered in this course.

Students are encouraged to incorporate into their papers other media (e.g. photographs, illustrations, text messages, Facebook posts, journal or diary excerpts, etc.) while still respecting the word count of the assignment as a whole. You are also encouraged to write this paper in your own voice and idiom of understanding – not necessarily in the third person – and are free to experiment with format of the scholarly paper wherever possible. Hard copies only. Due June 4th.

Duende Reflection (30%)

The Spanish poet Federico Garcia Lorca, in his essay “Play and Theory of the Duende,” talked about a mysterious force that might be felt in Andalusian music and art that seemed to come from the depths of the earth itself. “You have a voice, you know the style, but you will never triumph,” the Andalusian artist Manuel Torre said, “because you have no duende.”

No true art is possible without the duende, yet Lorca is also clear that the duende is as much a force that animates life as it brings us close to the edge of death. Its nature is double-sided: a gift to be welcomed as well as one to be feared.

For this assignment, you are asked to describe three instances in which you may have felt the duende in your own life – that sense of something larger than yourself. These might include a work of art that moved you or drove you to distraction; a person in whose company you felt as though you’d either arrived at your fullest self or pushed you to the brink of madness; a place in which you felt at home or terrified in the presence of the mysteries of existence. In other words, I would like you to reflect on the most intensely meaningful, powerful, non-ordinary experiences of your life. Minimum fifteen hundred words. Hard copies only. Due May 19th.

Quiz (10%)

You will be given one surprise quiz over the course of the semester. This quiz will be worth 10% of your final grade, and will be held at the beginning of class. There will be no provision given for a make-up quiz without an authorized medical note.

Final Exam (30%)

The final exam for “Twentieth Century Ideas” will consist of the following three components. Firstly, students will be asked to provide short definitions of course keywords (e.g. “feminism,” “orientalism,” “ecology of mind”) and short summaries of films from a list provided on Canvas. The second section of the exam will require you write short biographies from a list of the key figures discussed in this course (e.g. Gregory Bateson, bell hooks, Carl Jung). The third section of the exam will consist of one to two longer essay questions pertaining to course materials, including films, and may ask that you recite, with digressions, disagreements and variations, the major themes, or the “story,” of twentieth century intellectual history as offered in this course.

POLICY ON LATE ASSIGNMENTS & Incomplete Grades:

Papers will lose two percent a day off the total mark of any assignment for late submission.

CLASS CONDUCT AND EXPECTATIONS:

• You must ensure you are properly registered for the course. If you have any concerns about your registration status, you may confirm on-line, confirm with the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Sciences Office, or contact the Office of the Registrar. Please first check your registration and read the codes carefully (the codes are clearly explained in the Course Calendar which is available on-line at www.ocadu.ca).

• You are expected to conduct yourself in a manner respectful of your instructor and your fellow students. This includes, at a minimum:

• Arriving on time

• Turning off your cell phone upon arrival

• If late, entering the classroom with the least disruption

• Not interrupting or speaking when someone else has the floor

• Using your laptop appropriately (i.e. not for email)

ABSENCES AND MAKE UP TESTS

Only under very special circumstances may students hand in late assignments or be absent from classes or tests/exams. If a student is sick, it is incumbent upon the student to notify the Instructor (and the Office of the Registrar, in the case of missed final exams) with proper documentation as soon as possible. Students with special needs must contact the Centr
e for Students with Disabilities, ext. 339 at least two weeks prior to the test or assignment.

ABSENCE FOR RELIGIOUS PURPOSES:

A student who foresees a conflict between a religious obligation and any scheduled class assignments, including the final examination, must notify his/her instructor in writing and in the case of final examinations must make a written request to the Office of the Registrar within three weeks of publishing of the syllabus and/or the final exam schedule.

PLAGIARISM AND REFERENCING YOUR RESEARCH SOURCES:

Plagiarism is the act of taking someone else's ideas, opinions, writings, etc. and representing them as one's own. You plagiarize whenever you borrow another scholar's ideas or quote directly from a work without giving credit through proper citation or acknowledgement. Plagiarism is a serious offense at OCADU (please see OCADU's Policy in the OCADU Academic Calendar). Any assignment in which the ideas of another author are intentionally represented without acknowledgement and/or presented as the student's own work will receive a grade of zero.

ACADEMIC AND NON-ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT:

Each student has final responsibility for her or his conduct. Students are expected to be aware of and abide by the regulations as they have been established in OCAD U’s academic and non-academic policies. These policies outline the responsibility of students to “conduct themselves appropriately and reflect the highest standards of integrity in non-academic as well as academic behaviour”. All allegations of misconduct will be reported and investigated as per the current policies.

WEEKLY READINGS & CLASS SCHEDULE:

May 12th: In Search of Duende

Robert Bringhurst. “Lianhua Fengxian.” Selected Poems. Kentville: Gaspereau Press, 2009. 130-131.

Federico Garcia Lorca. “Play and Theory of the Duende.” In Search of Duende. New York: New Directions, 1998. 48-62.

May 14th: Encounters with the Unconscious

Anthony Stevens. “The man and his Psychology.” Jung: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. 1-45.

May 19th: Artisanship

Bruce Chatwin. From The Songlines. New York: Penguin Books, 1987.1-29.

Lawrence Blair. “Life Amongst the Men of Wood.” Ring of Fire. London: Transworld Publishers, 1988. 160-189.

May 21st: No Class!

May 26th: Martin Heidegger and Friends

Martin Heidegger. “Memorial Address.” Discourse on Thinking. New York: Harper Row, 1966. 43-57.

Leland de la Durantaye. “Being There.” Cabinet Magazine (25) Spring 2007. 1-12.

May 28th: Darth Skinner

B.F. Skinner. “The Experimental Analysis of Behaviour (A History). In Reflections on Behaviorism and Society. London: Prentice-Hall, 1978. 113-126.

Joseph Campbell & Bill Moyers. “The Hero’s Adventure.” The Power of Myth. New York: Anchor Books, 1991. 123-163.

June 2nd: The Gift and the Beatniks

Lewis Hyde. “The Commerce of the Creative Spirit.” The Gift: Imagination and the Erotic Life of Property. New York: Vintage Books, 1983. xi-xvii; 143-159.

Allen Ginsberg. “Howl” & “Footnote to Howl.” Collected Poems 1947-1997. New York: Harper Perennial, 2006. 134-142.

June 4th: Existentialism & Feminism

Ian Brown. “Why I read a difficult six volume diary by a Norwegian Novelist.” The Globe and Mail. April 26, 2014.

FILM: Donna Read. The Burning Times. National Film Board of Canada, 1990. 56 mins.

bell hooks. Feminism is for Everybody. London: Pluto Press, 2000. vii-6.

June 9th: Zen and the Art of Anti-Imperialism

FILM: David Grubin. The Life of Buddha. 2013. 112 mins.

Gretl Satorius et al. The Five Powers: Superheroes of Peace. Peace Is The Way Films Inc.

June 11th: The Postmodern Condition

Tim Woods. “Introduction: The Naming of Parts.” Beginning Postmodernism. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1999. 1-17.

June 16th: Indigeneity, Decolonization, Phenomenology, Mysticism

Henry Sharp. Loon: Memory, Meaning and Reality in a Northern Dene Community. Lincoln & London: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. 1-4; 44-47; 91-94; 109-116; 177-181.

David Abram. “The Boundary Keeper: Jeremy Hayward in conversation with David Abram.” Shambhala Sun Online.

Julia Martin. “Tonglen.” Nobody Home: Writing, Buddhism, and Living in Places. San Antonio: Trinity University Press, 2014. 231-234.

Tim Doody. “The Heretic.” Utne Reader, November-December 2012, 66-71.

June 18th: Environmentalism & Holistic Science

Fritjof Capra. “The Pattern Which Connects.” Uncommon Wisdom: Conversations with Remarkable People. New York: Bantam Books, 1989. 71-89.

UNIVERSITY RESOURCES:

Writing and Learning Centre:

Resources specific to this course, for students requiring assistance with the material and with writing or reading comprehension, and for those for whom English is a second language, are provided through theWriting and Learning Centre, room 1501, 113 McCaul, 5th floor (ext. 229). One-on-one tutoring is available and confidential. The Writing and Learning Centre (WLC) provides free services for all students including writing, critical thinking, critical reading, and study skills, through one-on-one tutoring, group tutoring, writing and academic skills workshops, resource materials, and ESL assistance.

Services for Students with Disabilities

Formal and informal student-centred supports, such as counselling, academic accommodations, and specialized services are available year-round to students registered with the Centre for Students with Disabilities. Students who think they may have learning or physical disabilities should contact Services for Students with Disabilities (ext. 339), 51 McCaul St. 2nd level, as soon as possible. Students must be registered with the CSD to receive accommodations and related support. It is important to register early in the semester to ensure the accommodations can be scheduled by the start of the semester.

Dorothy Hoover Library

OCADU Library, 113 McCaul, 2nd Floor , Room 1215

General Reference Desk: ex. 334

Art and Design Reference, Robert Fabbro: ex. 343

Art and Liberal Arts & Sciences Reference, Daniel Payne: ex. 217

Requirements/ Instructions

Students are asked to write a research paper, twenty-five hundred words in length, on any topic related to the content of readings and lectures, or, with the permission of the course instructor, a topic that falls within the purview of twentieth century intellectual history. Your paper should make use of minimum three primary sources, whether these be peer-reviewed academic journal articles or books from university presses, or writings or lectu
res by any of the thinkers and artists considered in this course.

Students are encouraged to incorporate into their papers other media (e.g. photographs, illustrations, text messages, Facebook posts, journal or diary excerpts, etc.) while still respecting the word count of the assignment as a whole. You are also encouraged to write this paper in your own voice and idiom of understanding – not necessarily in the third person – and are free to experiment with format of the scholarly paper wherever possible. Hard copies only. Due June 4th basically we have to research on someone's life that was greatly influenced by some duende we can research these people that are in the ppts. then decide which to write.

Why Us
100% Custom Written
English speaking writers
24/7/365 Support
Free revision
Free formatting
No Hidden fees
Home FAQs

 
Do you need a similar assignment done for you from scratch? We have qualified writers to help you. We assure you an A+ quality paper that is free from plagiarism. Order now for an Amazing Discount!
Use Discount Code "Newclient" for a 15% Discount!

NB: We do not resell papers. Upon ordering, we do an original paper exclusively for you.

Buy Custom Nursing Papers

Open chat
Need Help?
Need Help? You can contact our live agent via WhatsApp +1(209)962-2652
Feel free to seek clarification on prices, discount, or any other inquiry.
%d bloggers like this: